Shankarachi Aarti lavthavati vikrala

Lavathavati vikrala, brahmandi mala | Vishen kantha kala, trinetrim jwala ||

AARTI COLLECTION

12/10/20232 min read

Shri Shankarachi Aarti

Lavathavati vikrala, brahmandi mala |

Vishen kantha kala, trinetrim jwala ||

Lavanyasundar, mastakim bala |

Tethuniyan jala, nirmal vahe jhuljhula ||1||

Jayadeva jayadeva, jaya Shrishankara |

Aarti ovalu, tuj karpoorgaura ||Dhruv||

Karpoorgaura bhola, nayanin vishala |

Ardhangin Parvati, sumananchya mala ||

Vibhutiche udhalan, shitikanth nila |

Aisa Shankar shobhe, Umavelhala ||2||

Jayadeva jayadeva, jaya Shrishankara |

Aarti ovalu, tuj karpoorgaura ||Dhruv||

Devi daitya sagaramanthan pai kele |

Tyamaji yen avachit halahal uthile ||

Tey twam asurpane prashan kele |

Nilakantha naam prasiddh zhale ||3||

Jayadeva jayadeva, jaya Shrishankara |

Aarti ovalu, tuj karpoorgaura ||Dhruv||

Vyaghrambhar phanivaradhar, sundar madanari |

Panchanan manmohan, munijan sukhakari ||

Shatakotiche bij vache uchchari |

Raghukulatilak Ramdasa antarim ||4||

Jayadeva jayadeva, jaya Shrishankara |

Aarti ovalu, tuj karpoorgaura ||Dhruv||

This Aarti of Lord Shiva is a famous Marathi hymn that describes the various forms and attributes of Lord Shiva.

In the first two verses of the Aarti, Lord Shiva is depicted in a fierce and formidable form. His throat is darkened by poison, his three eyes are shining, and there is a young boy sitting on his head. Pure water is flowing from his forehead.

In the third and fourth verses, Lord Shiva is portrayed in a gentle and innocent form. The color of his body is as pure white as camphor, and his eyes are large. His consort Parvati is with him, and there is a garland of flowers around his neck. There is a glow of lightning emanating from his body, and his throat is blue.

In the fifth and sixth verses, Lord Shiva is described in a compassionate and merciful form. During the churning of the ocean, he drank the poison of Halahala, which turned his throat blue. He saved creation by consuming this poison.

In the seventh and eighth verses, Lord Shiva is depicted in a powerful and fearsome form. He wears a tiger skin, there is a king of snakes on his head, and he holds a trident, drum, and lotus in his hands. He has five faces and ten arms.

In the ninth and tenth verses, Lord Shiva is described as a wise and ascetic figure. He is knowledgeable about the Vedas and Upanishads, and he imparts knowledge to the sages. He chants the mantra of a hundred million seeds, which makes him all-powerful.

In the final verse of the Aarti, Lord Shiva is acknowledged as the supreme deity. He resides in the inner temple of Ramdas.

This Aarti is sung regularly by devotees of Lord Shiva, glorifying the magnificence of Lord Shiva.